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9 Strange and Beautiful TVs That Will Define 2020

As ever, CES has brought us a menagerie of new TVs, from the practical to the anything-but. Here are the most notable ones we’ve seen.

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The Consumer Electronics Show has historically been host to industry-shifting announcements from the Commodore 64, to the DVD, to the original Xbox. But nowadays, its main attraction tends to be huge, expensive, absurd televisions. In that respect, 2020 is no exception, and heavy hitters like Samsung, LG and Sony are all bringing out their big guns and revealing a slate of boob tubes that run the gamut from experimental and fiendishly expensive to budget sets that punch above their weight. Here are some of the best, and some of the craziest, TVs that cropped up at CES this year.

Vizio’s First-Ever OLED TV

Vizio announced updated models of its V-Series, M-Series and P-Series Quantum X of 4K TVs, but the standout was its announcement of its first-ever OLED TVs. They’ll be available in 55-inch and 65-inch models, and both will released sometime later this year. Vizio has yet to release pricing, but you can expect these to be among the most affordable OLED TVs on the market.

Learn More: Here

LG’s Rollable TV

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Technically a repeat from 2019, LG’s rollable TV has shown up at CES yet again, this time with the promise of an impending 2020 release. While LG hasn’t officially locked in price or availability just yet, CNET reports the set is slated to launch in the second or third quarter of 2020 for a whopping $60,000.

Learn More: Here

Samsung’s Shapeshifting Sero TV

Arguably the craziest TV that Samsung announced at CES, The Sero is a 4K TV that can rotate its screen between a traditional horizontal mode and a new vertical mode. (“Sero” means “vertical” in Korean.) The idea is that more people are sharing content directly from their smartphones to their TV, be it on YouTube, Snapchat or TikTok, and this TV will actually be able to show that content its proper orientation. Admittedly, it’s strange but also kind of neat. As of now the TV only comes in a 43-inch model. Samsung says it will “expand The Sero’s availability to several global markets in 2020,” after an initial launch in South Korea last year. Whether that means it’ll actually be available in the US, we’ll have to wait and see to find out.

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LG’s GX Gallery TVs that Sit on Your Wall Like a Picture

LG’s new GX Gallery series of 4K Ultra HD TVs is designed to look like a piece of art hanging on your wall, similar to Samsung’s The Frame TVs. The Gallery Series TVs come with a specially-designed wall mount so that they hang completely flush on the wall, and you’ll be able to customize the art when you aren’t watching. The Gallery Series TVs all have the ultra-thin form factor (20 millimeters thin) that LG’s OLEDs are known for. And they will come in three different sizes — 55-, 65- and 77-inch. No pricing or availability information yet, but you can bet they will be freakishly expensive.

Learn More: Here

Samsung’s “Zero-Bezel” Q950 TV

Samsung’s new 8K QLED TV isn’t just notable for its picture, but also for what’s (not) around it. The new flagship Q950 has, according to Samsung, a 99 percent screen-to-frame ratio, which means that the border around its picture is practically non-existent at just 2.3mm thick, for however that much is worth to you. And it better be worth a lot. While Samsung hasn’t divulged price or availability quite yet, if it runs in the same league as its predecessors, you can expect a price tag well above $10,000.

Learn More: Here

Panasonic HZ2000 OLED TV

The next-generation of last year’s GZ2000, the Panasonic HZ2000 is the company’s newest OLED TV and it’s optimized for cinephiles, home theater buffs and industry professionals. It’s the first OLED TV to support both Dolby Vision IQ and Filmmaker Mode, the later of which is a setting that promises to make movies look exactly how the director intended, Panasonic worked with famed Hollywood colorist Stefan Sonnenfeld (Wonder Woman, A Star is Born, Star Wars: The Force Awakens) to achieve this high-grade color accuracy. It will be available later this year and come in either 55-inch and 65-inch models

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Sony Z8H 8K TV

Sony announced a bunch of new TVs at this year’s show, but the Z8H 8K LED is its most notable. It has a neat feature that Sony is calling “Ambient Optimization” which allows the TV to automatically tune its sound to the room its located in. Additionally, the Z8H 8K LED has a tweeter built directly into its frame and it vibrates to generate sound. Basically, if you don’t want to use additional speakers, the Z8H 8K LED’s built-in speakers should sound pretty darn impressive.

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LG’s 2020 NanoCell OLED TVs

These are LG’s new creme de la creme TVs that are able to produce a “real 8K” picture. They have cool minimalistic design and a fancy-new processor — called the Alpha 9 Gen 3 AI Processor — that LG claims leverages more power and more advanced artificial intelligence deep learning algorithms; it’s basically able to deliver the best 8K picture possible. And it will be available in 88- and 77-inch models.

Learn More: Here

LG’s New 48-inch OLED TV

New year, new size. LG just announced that it will, for the first time, make a 48-inch OLED TV. This particular new model, the OLED48CX, has over 8 million pixels in its tiny 48-inch screen, which LG claims is a density comparable to that of a 96-inch 8K TV. Basically, for anybody who has wanted the best possible TV but in a very small form factor, now you can.

Learn More: Here


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